July, 2013 Archives

You can’t win! My last blog showing a very early photograph of an Orange parade by the Museum triggered a number of unpleasant posts – the gist of which were that I was a bigot for having the temerity to post anything to do with such an important part of Liverpool’s history. No apologies from me – but all abusive posts are removed as a matter of course. This site is for those genuinely interested in the way Liverpool is represented by photography – not as somewhere to vent unreasoned and bigoted opinions.
That’s got that off my chest – so on to today’s blog: an unusual street view of Old Hall Street and the newly built Cotton Exchange. I add unusual because it is an amateur’s photograph and I haven’t seen any others of the street. The woman with her bucket gives a dramatic feel to the early morning scene. I am guessing the photograph was taken shortly after the Exchange was opened in 1906. A fine Edwardian Baroque building, it had a short life, or at least the facade did. The side elevations still survive but the fine colonnaded facade was unceremoniously replaced by a dreary moden frontage in 1967. A sad loss for the building symbolised Liverpool’s first ranking in the cotton trade.

I promise to post no more July 12th photographs for the foreseeable future but today’s image is somewhat special. I am guessing it was taken in about 1890 (possibly slightly earlier or later) and, as such, represents the earliest visual record of this annual event. The building on the right is the Museum (its current steps were introduced when the street was lowered in 1902). Lloyd’s Outfitters in the background, were at 1-3 Byrom Street – and were there throughout the late 1870s into the 1890s. My only other clues to the date are the clothing – never a precise way of dating – and the nature of the photograph (a carte de visite which had fallen out of popularity by the early 1890s).
The actual date aside, the photograph shows a large crowd stretching to the foot of Dale Street. I know very little about the history of the Orange parades but here is a bit of visual evidence that can be added to our understanding of Liverpool’s history, however unsavoury it has been at times.
Below is a close up of the large banner – ‘Lily of the North’ with a large central image of King Billy on his stallion.