March, 2015 Archives

The-Cow

The Cow Butter Shop

Woman-and-pipe

Enjoying a quiet pipe

Men-outside-pub

Men outside an unnamed pub

Woman-knitting

Woman knitting in a street market

Steble-Fountain

Children around the Steble Fountain

Bird-seller

Woman selling birds

Wellington-Monument

The Wellington Monument

Women-with-rags

Selling clothes on the street

I have just received a request from Pete O’Keefe regarding a set of lantern slides I commented on back in October 2010. I have long been fascinated by this series, which was commercially sold by Riley Brothers of Bradford, the largest mass producers of lantern slides in Britain at the turn of the nineteenth century. Pete has just put his boxed set on Ebay and comments:
I have a set of these Magic Lantern Slides (Slums In Our Cities) and I have No. 1 to 54.
They are in their original wooden slide box. It is my belief that this was possibly a set of 60. as there are 60 sections in the box
– and asks whether I have any record of any missing images.
Not an easy question – I have the total number listed as 52 – but there could have been subsequent editions. Pete’s slides on Ebay show images not in my list so I am reckon the full set might well have been at least 60.
What I do know is that the photographs were taken by Thomas Burke, a city councillor for Vauxhall and a keen amateur photographer. He donated an album of 27 silver prints from his negatives to the City Library – where the quality is vastly superior to the poorly hand-coloured slides I have copies of (and which Pete is selling on Ebay).
If one can ignore the crude colouring, the slides are very interesting examples of street photography using a hidden camera. The subject matter is more street people than slum living – the slums are hardly seen in fact. Some are in well-known sites, such as St John’s Market and William Brown Street. Many show street traders such as women selling fish, clothes and caged birds. Overall, a fascinating record of Liverpool at the turn of the nineteenth century and of an early obsession of capturing the lives of the poor on film. Riley Bros. sold the complete sets for entertainment – at a time when magic lantern slide shows were popular with an audience who would be more likely to be amused by the images than stirred by social conscience. There would have been a printed commentary to be read out as each slide was projected – sadly I do not have a copy of what would be a fascinating read today (the evils of drink, the undeserving poor …).
Nothing much changes, with today’s announcement that the Grand National organisers are looking to throw out photographers who take derogatory photos of Ladies’ Day for the tabloid press. Sadly, there is a ready audience out there to be titillated by the lives of others – and Liverpool is always a magnet for photographers looking for easy images.

Harrington-Board

Harrington Board School, on the corner of Stanhope Street and Grafton Street, 1975

St-Malachy's-1975

St Malachy’s School and Church, Beaufort Street, 1975

Beaufort-Street-1975

Beaufort Street County Primary, 1975

Parkhill-County-Primary-1977

Parkhill County Primary, 1977

Windsor-Street-School-1975

Windsor Street County Primary

Whenever I look through my collection of photographs of Liverpool in the 1970s (the decade I came to Liverpool), I am always amazed at the amount of change that has taken place in such a relatively short period of time – after all, forty years is within most of our lifetimes. When I arrived in 1970, the population of the city was 610,000. Now it is 464,000 (2011 Census). Going back further to 1931, the recorded population was 846,000: in 1961 it was 745,000. In other words, the demographic changes have been huge and the city has had to adjust in a relatively short period of time.
The casualties have been the many requirements of a more densely populated city: housing, industry, and public services such as hospitals and schools.

Schools have seen an incredible change, partly due to changes in education thinking as well as the plummeting school age population of the inner city. New schools have been built to replace crumbling Victorian board schools with the vacant buildings usually being demolished. Quite a few still survive and they are an essential part of our heritage. Universal education was heralded in with the Elementary Education Act of 1870 – which is one of the great milestones of social reform. Local authorities were legally obliged to step up their provision and the result, in Liverpool, was an impressive stock of well-built schools throughout the borough.

The photographs captured some of the many schools in the Dingle. Harrington Board School was one of Liverpool’s earliest schools (dating back to 1815 or earlier as Harrington Free School). The building was late nineteenth century (it was on the site of what is now Cain’s Brewery car park). I have no demolition or closure date but it must have been one of the largest primary schoolS in Liverpool. St Malachy’s survived as a school until 2010 (St Malachy?s church and school have recently been demolished and housing built on the site by Gleesons – thanks to Graham Calderbank for this information). Beaufort Street school, on the same stretch of road, was less fortunate and burnt down a few years after closing in 2000 (when it merged as a new school with Parkhill Primary (the new school has since closed down). I have fond memories of Beaufort Street Primary (the Bewey – the local pronunciation was Bewfort – not Bowfort). My wife taught there for many years and I often visited – and took photographs as it was about to close in 2000.

Windsor Street School was originally the Wesleyan Day and Sunday School. I don’t have a closing date but I do have photographs taken by Bert Hardy of Picture Post magazine as part of his feature about the British race relations in 1949. The playground is the roof area on the right (inside the railings). Can you imagine that being allowed today?

Windsor-Street-roof

New-Brighton-1947

New-Brighton-Baths

New Brighton Baths, 1947

In my lifetime, I have seen many changes to the way people live. Technology is one of the most profound – in everything from computers and the internet to medicines and their impact on life expectancy. Amongst other changes is greater affluence and how we use our leisure time. Looking at the two photographs of New Brighton, taken in 1947, it is a fading memory for many of us (those who remember the 1950s and 60s – and earlier) of how basic holidays were. In the difficult years after the War, a few days at New Brighton, or a similar resort, were all that could be hoped for for most people. Even on the beach a dress code applied – with suits and ties almost de rigeur.
The idea of an evening at the open air baths would fill most people with horror but this was all part of a good day out. It brings home how hard our parents’ and grandparents’ generation had it and how hard won were any real luxuries in life.

Pete-Dench-pic

By way of contrast, today’s generation have a totally different take on holidays and enjoyment. I have just embarked on a Kickstarter campaign with photographer Peter Dench to raise funds for his brilliant book The British Abroad. This is a fascinating look at an aspect of our culture and really shows the difference is attitudes between the post-War generation and young people today. Have a look at the project and why not subscribe to one of the great rewards.
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1042194258/the-british-abroad-hardback-photo-book